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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Mar 4, 2011 6:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

Whereas I can't remember any numbers if they're NOT dates. I have to have a mental picture in my head. Even for phone numbers. Could be show dates, but actually, mostly other stuff in history. Particularly -- here's one to make the guys howl -- women's fashions. Try it Ringo, it helps. 1878, for instance, was a very good year for women's clothing :-)

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Poster: wineland Date: Mar 4, 2011 8:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

Interesting, for phone numbers I see a geometric pattern. For instance in college our phone number was 753-2159. If you look at the keys on the phone you go up diagonally to the right, across to top, and then back down diagonally to make a X. That's simple one, but I use patterns to remember most phone numbers. I think the sickness was cemented working for AT&T.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 5, 2011 4:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

That's fascinating - I never even heard of such a thing (remembering numbers in geometric patterns).
I have strange methods of jogging my memory for things I need to do, like setting objects in incongruous places so that when I come across them in the wrong place I will be alerted that there's something I need to do. Like leaving one shoe on the stairs. My husband points out this sort of thing with random household objects in the wrong places will be increasingly hard to distinguish from dementia ...

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Poster: wineland Date: Mar 6, 2011 12:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

I like it, putting pieces out of place to alert you. Not sure if you have kids. I think that method would fall apart here. A 6 and 11 year old can put more in random places that I can mentally keep up with. I'd be wondering what the Leapster in the middle of the stairs means and would most likely need to head to the garage fridge for a beer to contemplate it. After a couple trips to the garage all bets would be off.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 6, 2011 7:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

LOL - no, it won't work with little kids in the house! My son is a teenager and his patterns are predictable - sweatshirts and gunky gymn clothes in the living room, dishes accumulating in his bedroom, but it's not as bad as when there were Leggos and plastic soldiers underfoot in every room. Now there is room for my own craziness to reassert itself on household routines (and I know when he leaves I'll miss even the foul gymn clothes).

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Poster: boltman Date: Mar 4, 2011 7:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

I've even tried mnemonics, but I screw them up too.

Was it "In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue." or

"In 1493, Columbus sailed the great big sea." or

"In 1494, Columbus reached America's shore."

...adult onset of ADHD is a sad thing to witness.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 4, 2011 7:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

I'm not exactly a fashionista, but 1878? :)
Miss Kitty in Gunsmoke maybe?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 4, 2011 8:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

If you and Rosey care, studies have been done on this...I will not bore you with lengthy explanations of these phenomena, but, I will tell you how I made a small joke once in reference to such a presentation (warning: you had to be there; it's not that funny): the speaker was discussing brain memory with respect to numbers, and it was very arcane, and yet riveting for geeks like elb, Rob, and myself. It had gone on, and on, with many an interesting factoid, when he suddenly came to his big finale, which was "...Thus, it is clear from these analyses that the human brain reaches an apex in numerical sequence retention at ~ 16 yrs of age, and that the optimal number of digits is 7", and it was so quiet that my comment "Ah, that's WHY they are always on the phone!" was overheard by most...a few seconds later, the speaker, and everyone else burst out laughing.

See? Scientists have fond memories of funny things involving numbers...

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Poster: boltman Date: Mar 5, 2011 6:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

I have scanned the research on the Magic Number 7 - plus or minus 2, but find myself consistently coming up on the minus 3 end of the equation. I have begun consciously working on it, hoping to increase the short term memory retention to at least 5, thereby pushing off the onset of dementia!

I've been doing it with phone numbers...after this enjoyable thread, I've decided to do it with shows.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 5, 2011 8:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

Six or more cups of coffee per day helps as well...seriously. This has been documented; I make no apologies for other health related consequences of the ingestion of this amt of caffine.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 5, 2011 4:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

Cute :) but I'm surprised to hear it peaks at 16. I remember when my son was going into first grade one of the tests for "readiness" was being able to remember a string of seven digits. (He couldn't do it ... and I think it was in fact a good test, since he has proven to have the family mathematical impairment - my husband's the same way, none of us can add 2 and 2 and reliably get 4).

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Mar 4, 2011 9:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Dates

Miss Kitty? Hmph. Right period, wrong hair. Darned Hollywood.

Now, an archives first ... links to 19th century fashion! There were many good years, but here's 1878:

http://expositions.bnf.fr/proust/grand/145.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:James_Tissot_-_Seaside.jpg

http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/display_image.php?id=9750

I cheated on the last one. It's actually 1877. But I guess if you had a dress like that, you'd wear it at least for another year.



This post was modified by AltheaRose on 2011-03-04 17:12:59